Is Weed Legal in Pennsylvania? | Cannabis Legalization

Is recreational cannabis legal in Pennsylvania? Is medicinal marijuana legal in Pennsylvania? What about Pennsylvania's CBD laws? Find out about the weed laws in Pennsylvania in this article.

Pennsylvania, otherwise known as 'Amish America' is a state situated on the east coast of the United States which is well known for its high number of Amish communities and historic landmarks. Interestingly, Pennsylvania has the most Amish communities in the United States. Furthermore, Pennsylvania is the chocolate capital of the USA, with the unincorporated community of Hershey, located in Township Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania is illustrious for many historical monuments, including the Liberty Bell, which is a national icon that symbolises the countries independence. One can find the Liberty Bell in the Independence National Park located in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania is also the pioneer of the Philly cheesesteak sandwich. So if you fancy yourself a wholesome cheesy, meat-filled culinary invention, you can thank the residents of Philadelphia for that one.

Pennsylvania is one of the country's original 13 colonies and has some incredible facets, but what about cannabis in the state? Is the state that is responsible for inventing the Philly cheesesteak and Hershey's chocolate accepting of cannabis in any form whether it be recreational or medicinal?

Read further to discover Pennsylvania's laws surrounding cannabis.

Is recreational weed legal Pennsylvania?

It is common amongst some Americans to put their recreational weed inside of a Philly Cigar and casually light up, however, it is not permitted to do so whilst in Philadelphia. Unfortunately, recreational weed is illegal in Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania defines cannabis as a scheduled 1 controlled substance and getting caught with possession can stick you with some pretty harsh punishments. Possession of under 30 grams is a misdemeanor crime along with a $500 fine and 30 days in the slammer (jail). Anything over 30 grams and that 30-day sentence turns into 100 days. However, cannabis has been decriminalised in some select major cities of Pennsylvania, such as Philadelphia and Pittsburg.

Senate Bill 350 was introduced in 2019 with the purpose of legalising recreational weed for adult use in Pennsylvania, and by a reflection from state voters, the bill was 59% in favor of yes. The legislation was also aimed at expunging prior criminal convictions relating to cannabis. Despite the favortism of legalisation, state senators opposed the vote and the bill fell short of passing. Luckily for Pennsylvania pot lovers, that's not the end for cannabis legalisation. Although the first attempt was unsuccessful, the bill will be reintroduced and circulated in the upcoming election in November 2020.

By 2021, Pennsylvania residents may be able to enjoy some legal recreational weed. Until then, those cheesy steak filled sandwiches will have to be enjoyed without the munchies.

Is medicinal marijuana legal in Pennsylvania?

Fortunately for Pennsylvanian patients who need cannabis for medical reasons, medicinal marijuana is legal in the state.

Pennsylvania began its medicinal marijuana endeavors in 2016, and from the majority of the state in favor of cannabis use for medical purposes, it was rendered legal. State governor, Tom Wolf, signed the medical marijuana bill in 2016, which legalised the production and use of medicinal cannabis. The bill allows those who have conditions that necessitate marijuana access there supply legally from licensed dispensaries. Conditions that qualify Pennsylvanians for medical use include cancer, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and Crohn's disease.

Medicinal marijuana is legal in the chocolate capital of the USA, however, it is on the conservative side of the law. Patients can only access up to 30 grams of flower per month and that of which cannot be smoked. Cannabis can only be consumed through tinctures, pills, oils, topical creams, or vaporisers. Combustible consumption of cannabis is not permitted in Pennsylvania by any means.

In contrast to medicinal marijuana laws in other states, Pennsylvania does not allow patients to cultivate their own cannabis. Home growing is punishable by a misdemeanor, 2 years imprisonment, and a hefty fine. Luckily for Pennsylvanians, there is a bevvy of dispensaries to choose from, so home-growing is unnecessary.

The laws in the United States are in constant fluctuation, so medicinal marijuana laws are destined to change in Pennsylvania in the future.

Is CBD legal in Pennsylvania?

CBD, an active chemical compound in cannabinoids, has swept the world by storm as of late. CBD is used in many areas of the world for its medical benefits, which include inflammation and treating disorders such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Fortunately, for those that reside in Pennsylvania, CBD is legal.

Even though it is legal, there are stipulations regarding CBD in Pennsylvania. Firstly it must come from hemp and contain no more than 0.3% THC. CBD extracted from cannabis is only permitted for use by those who have a medical marijuana card. Pennsylvanian residents who wish to reap the medical benefits of CBD can access it from a variety of shops and online retailers. CBD products can be consumed in a variety of forms ranging from gummies, oils, topicals, and tinctures.

As many are aware, the United States enacted the Farm Bill in 2018, which legalised industrial hemp and made CBD legal in all 50 states. In summary, hemp-derived CBD is very much legal in the historical iconic state of Pennsylvania, and with another election season upon us, CBD may become legal in cannabis form by 2021. Until then, Amish America can enjoy the fruits of the hemp plant and all it has to offer.

Subscribe Now
& Keep Up to Date

Get the latest pot stock recommendations, cannabis news
and industry updates straight to your inbox!

Casey Peternell
Casey Peternell

Casey is a media and content creator with a keen eye for creativity. Casey is currently in the process of obtaining a double bachelors degree in Media & Communications and Business from Swinburne University in Melbourne.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *