Is Weed Legal In Massachusetts? | Cannabis Legalization

Is recreational cannabis legal in Massachusetts? Is medicinal marijuana legal in Massachusetts? What about Massachusetts' CBD laws? Find out in this article.

Massachusetts is where some of the most monumental events in American history transpired. There was the prominent political protest, known as the Boston Tea Party, in 1770, and more recently the Boston Red Sox put an end to the notorious "Bambino Curse" and won the major league baseball World Series in 2004. Massachusetts is one of the original 13 colonies of North America, and has since gone on to produce a deep culture.

It's also worth mentioning that Massachusetts is home to some of the most influential people of America both past and present. There's Benjamin Franklin, Mark Wahlberg, and Samuel Adams to name a few. Ben Franklin invented the lightbulb, Marky Mark is an Academy Award-nominated actor, and Samuel Adams was a founding father of the United States. It's safe to say that Massachusetts has produced some absolute legends. Furthermore, let us not forget about Tom Brady and his winning of 6 Super Bowl championships.

A place with a rich history and iconic people indeed, but what about marijuana in Massachusetts? Is cannabis allowed in a state where happy hour in pubs is against the law? is it legal to bong out in Boston? Is medical marijuana legal in Massachusetts?  

Let us explore the topic further and discover the legalities of cannabis in Massachusetts in this article.

Is Recreational Weed Legal in Massachusetts?

A lot transpired back in 2016 in the United States. Donald Trump was elected president, Barack Obama left office, and recreational weed was made legal in Massachusetts. That's right, luckily for the people of Massachusetts they can legally light up a joint in the comfort of their own home without any fuss from the fuzz. Since 2016 adults over the age of 21 are allowed to purchase, possess, and consume cannabis in the state.  

Massachusetts is at the forefront of cannabis legalization on the east coast of the United States. In fact, it's the first state on the east coast to make recreational weed legal. This makes sense being that Massachusetts was one of the original 13 colonies in North America, and is the birthplace of some of the most notorious pioneers of all time.

The first two dispensaries opened in 2018, and now Massachusetts is a mecca for marijuana with over 30 recreational cannabis dispensaries in operation. According to Massachusetts state laws, it is now legal to purchase up to 1 ounce of flower from state authorised dispensaries and stow up to 10 ounces at home. Residents can also grow up to 6 plants per person or 12 plants per household. Although Massachusetts is the East Coast pioneer of recreational weed, it's illegal to consume any form in public.

Now that weed is legal in Massachusetts, people in the state might have a hard time spelling out Massachusetts. I mean it's hard enough spelling it while sober.

Is Medicinal Marijuana legal in Massachusetts?

Prior to the legalization of recreational weed, medicinal marijuana was made legal in November 2012 in Massachusetts. Massachusettians with a debilitating disease or ailment can legally access medical marijuana if they have written approval from a qualified physician.

As a result of voters in favour of Question 3, Massachusetts was the 18th state in the U.S to legalize medical marijuana. However, it wasn't a quick and easy process. The bill was passed in 2012 and registered effect in 2013. With difficulties in the program and delays with legislation, it wasn't until 2015 that patients of Massachusetts could access medical marijuana from a dispensary. 

To qualify for a Massachusetts medical marijuana certificate one must suffer from debilitating diseases such as cancer, glaucoma, Crohn's disease, anorexia, or anxiety. After gaining approval from a qualified physician, the patient is obligated to submit an application to the Cannabis Control Commission. After completing a lengthy process, a medical marijuana cardholder can access up to 60 days of supply, which equates to 10 ounces of flower. A medical marijuana card also allows a patient to cultivate their own 60 day supply, but only on the basis of where they cannot easily access a dispensary.

Is CBD legal in Massachusetts?

CBD has become one of the most prominent chemical compounds to medical alternatives in the modern era. CBD is used all across the world in places where its legal, and thanks to the Farm Bill of 2014, hemp-derived CBD is legal in all 50 states of America, including Massachusetts. 

States like Massachusetts where recreational weed is legal, CBD can also be extracted from cannabis. Visitors and residents of the state can enjoy both hemp and cannabis-derived CBD legally. Both types of CBD have their health benefits however, CBD extracted from cannabis will alter the state of mind. So if Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch are looking to CBD for its anti-inflammatory properties without the psychoactive component, hemp based CBD is the way to go.

In contrast to cannabis, hemp cannot be grown for personal use in Massachusetts. Persons who wish to cultivate hemp in hopes of extracting CBD must have a license permitted by the state which authorises cultivation for commercial purposes only.

CBD is in absolute abundance in the state of Massachusetts. It can be purchased in retail stores, cannabis dispensaries, vape shops, and online. CBD can be consumed in a variety of ways which include edibles, topicals, oils, and vapes. Although CBD is legal in Massachusetts, it shares the same laws as cannabis so consumption of any form is not permitted in public.

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Casey Peternell
Casey Peternell

Casey is a media and content creator with a keen eye for creativity. Casey is currently in the process of obtaining a double bachelors degree in Media & Communications and Business from Swinburne University in Melbourne.

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